STORIES SEEN THROUGH A GLASS PLATE

Q239135 — Miss Hopkins, 1918

Box 57

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Image 2: H6216 — Pinyoun, Hopkins & Holder in clerical costume, 1914

Image 3: H6218 — Pinyoun, Hopkins & Holder in clerical costume, 1914

 

In July 1917 Alice Hopkins buried her mother, Maria Hopkins, who had six sons and two other daughters. Five of the sons served in the war, the eldest being too old to serve. Their late father had been a groom in racing stables in Lewes. In 1918 the youngest son Herbert died in France, aged 25, from wounds received. He is listed on the Lewes War memorial. His brother Frederick was so severely wounded in the left leg that his foot had to be amputated. He survived the war but was badly disabled. He lived at this address with his sister Alice and brother Walter (a market gardener) till he died in 1943, aged 62.

 

Two Miss Hopkins’ attended the funeral of their mother Mrs Maria Hopkins on 17 July 1917, sisters Florence (aged about 37), and Alice (about 30). Their elder sister Annie Maria who had married William H Holman in 1902, also attended.

 

Maria Hopkins also left 6 sons, 5 of whom were serving in the war: Sergeant William Arthur Hopkins, Sussex Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA), Gunner Frederick Charles Hopkins, Sussex RGA, Gunner Walter Augustus Hopkins, Royal Field Artillery, Lance Corporal Herbert Edward Hopkins, Royal Sussex Regiment, and Private Freeman George Hopkins, Cyclists’ Battalion. Their eldest brother Henry was possibly over military service age.

 

Their late father, also Henry Hopkins had been a groom working at racing stables around the country, and his children had been born variously at places like Newmarket, Ascot, and Lewes. The family had lived at Castle Cottages, Lewes, but by 1911 five of the offspring and their widowed mother had moved to 21 Keere Street. The elder daughters were working as dress-makers, Frederick was a chauffeur for Dr F. Loud of Lewes, William was a guide at Lewes Castle, Walter was a Grocer’s Assistant, and Herbert was a solicitor’s clerk with Lewis and Holman. Four of the sons were in the choir of St Michael’s Church (see pictures).

 

Tragedy struck in September 1918 when the youngest son, Herbert died in hospital in France from wounds received in combat, aged 25. He had served in Palestine before moving on to the Western Front. Herbert Edward Hopkins is listed on the Lewes War Memorial. Soon after that the family received news that Herbert’s elder brother Frederick had been so severely wounded in the left leg that his foot had to be amputated. He had been serving overseas for about 12 months. Frederick survived but was disabled - he lived out the rest of his life at 21 Keere Street with his sister Alice and brother Walter (a market gardener) and died in 1943 aged 62.